Product Development Launch – Default Software and Practices Stack

Context

Here at Oasis Digital, some of our projects are (approximately) “green field” product development launches. The scope of such a project typically includes some CRUD-like features, but also a complex-behavior feature or two. The effort typically lasts a few weeks or at most a few months, after which work is transitioned to customer developers (or occasionally to longer-term ongoing work here).

During a product development launch, we typically demonstrate:

  • Key goals are around user experience, UI development, etc
  • Key use cases of a system
  • Working software, sufficiently deployable for demonstrations
  • Feasibility and suitability of a technology stack, client and server side

Importantly though, during such a launch effort the long-term viability of the underlying customer vision is not yet fixed nor proven. Rather, a product launch refines the vision and proves the potential value.

Executing a product launch

For the reasons above, it is vital that we execute a product development launch expediently. The process is typically something like so.

  • Understand the vision and goals
  • Collaboratively define some key use cases, and key user experiences
  • Defer as much complexity as possible, outside of these key use cases; don’t let the development launch turn in to just a planning effort
  • Choose off-the-shelf tooling to facilitate quick implementation
  • Define key screen flows for the use cases
  • Consider what data appears on each screen (report, integration, etc.), and the flow of data through the system
  • Define an initial “schema of the system”, iteratively through the launch effort
  • Work on an iterative cadence so that we can get through at least several significant iterations during the short project duration

All of that is just context though; what I really want to talk about here is our default software stack for launching a fresh new project. These are just defaults; they often vary by the needs of a specific project, customer, deployment context, etc.

Client / UI

As of 2017, we generally default to a single page web application powered by Angular. While we also work in React and other tools, Angular is where we have the greatest shared experience (from extensive development work, as well as from teaching Angular Boot Camp) and therefore the greatest immediate collaborative productivity.

Angular is also the technology area where we innovate most. We use it for many projects, we train on it, we follow its development closely, we participate in open source. We attend and sponsor conferences. We are connected with the Angular community.

At the same time, customers coming to us for a product launch are typically most interested in seeing a working user interface that demonstrates their vision. Therefore the greatest share of our work in a product development launch is in the user interface.

Server

Because typically our time is focused primarily on user interface/client-side work, it is important to have a set of highly effective tools with which we can execute well-understood server-side APIs very quickly. Therefore, we default to:

  • Java
  • Spring Boot
  • Spring JPA / HIbernate
  • Various other ancillary related libraries and tools
  • A transaction scripting approach for the handful of complex use cases in a bunch effort

These tools are, perhaps to a 2017 eye, somewhat boring. But they are boring because they are well proven, they work. They very rarely yield, within the scope of initial development, any significant obstacles to delivery. That makes them very well suited for a short-duration effort.

Because these tools are so well proven, and because they permit a mostly declarative implementation approach, the resulting small code base warrant little automated testing at the beginning.  We don’t need tests to show that this stack can correctly implement a RESTful API; if it had any trouble doing so, we would replace the stack, not nitpick it with tests.

(While Java is the typical default, we also frequently use Node and related libraries instead; there is a trade-off here between less mature tools, versus the payoff of using more similar technology between client and server code.)

GraphQL

Sometimes things are not quite as boring as they seem though. If the data to be fetched is complex, we typically pick up GraphQL to slash the code quantity and development time for complex data fetching. Data volumes are usually modest during a short-term launch effort, so a straightforward lazy fetching approach via GraphQL resolvers (which go by another name in some implementations) does the job with little effort. This sometimes results in “N+1” database query operations – a problem to be solved later in development, once the scaling and performance attributes are understood.  GraphQL provides a means to do those optimizations, which we defer until they are needed.

Database

At the database layer, we innovate the least. We typically recommend a common and well-proven relational database. Our default is PostgreSQL, although sometimes customer deployment needs may result in MS SQL Server or another RDBMS.

Product development launch efforts are about speed, so we don’t the database schemas by hand. We define data structures in program code then use the tooling (for example, a JPA implementation) generate the schema. Data migration is also generally not an issue in a short-term launch effort; those come into play in a longer lived project which goes in production with data to preserve across versions.

Deployment

Large, long-term software projects will end up with specialized operations experts who shepherd them through critical infrastructure – but this post is about short product launch projects. These projects need to be made visible for review, demonstration and so on, long before the organizational wheels can turn for serious deployment infrastructure.

Therefore, we typically simply deploy the software for demonstration, to a cloud server instance of some kind (AWS, Google Cloud, Digital Ocean, etc), with minor scripting or tooling to automate deploying new versions frequently (sometimes even at every commit) during development. This is not scalable, and not nearly as automatable as more robust solutions, but it is a perfect starting point for something to put in place right away.

Quality

During a short-duration project effort, we write code quickly, but still keep a close eye on quality. Writing good code typically results in faster progress, beyond the timescale of the day or two.

What about the rest of the tools and practices?

Reading back over this description of the choices we make to launch an effort quickly, you might get the impression that we don’t deploy modern techniques, that we haven’t heard of all of the latest (or decades worth) of buzzwords. On the contrary, we have a full array of additional techniques to apply as a project grows in scope, size, and duration.

Micro Services

For certain projects, a micro service architecture produces numerous benefits. But even the esteemed software architect Martin Fowler suggest starting with a monolith: https://martinfowler.com/bliki/MonolithFirst.html

Unit testing

During a product launch, much of the code is boring ordinary use external libraries, which needs very little unit testing. But a project that grows beyond the initial launch will need lots of unit testing around any logic of complexity or interest.

API testing

As APIs become more complex, they warrant thorough test coverage – so a project that grows will get that coverage.

E2E Testing

A product launch effort typically yields a modest number of screens, undergoing rapid change, therefore unsuitable for browser-based end to end automated testing. Therefore, we skipped that during the launch effort.

We don’t forget though – here at Oasis Digital we are very big fans of automated E2E testing, and have seen it pay off on a daily basis, for most any project that lives more than a few months.

NoSQL

NoSQL can solve a great number of problems, and we recommend this type of data store when it is needed. This rarely occurs in the first month or two of the project when the vision and user experience are still being understood.

CQRS / DDD / ES

We have used these techniques extensively, as you can read about elsewhere on our blog. But we mostly set these skills aside during a fast product launch, these are things that pay off its scale but which can make it hard to get to scale as they are allowed to consume too much time early in a project.

Planning and Methodology

During a short launch effort, planning happens primarily via a whiteboard, or spreadsheet, or similar tool. If the values proven in vision works, a project may grow large enough to warrant more complex planning and project management.

Issue tracking

Although we work extensively with issue tracking technology (our sister company builds add-on products and provide services around Atlassian Jira), during a product launch effort our issue tracking approach is intentionally very lightweight. Issues that won’t get attention during the launch effort, are simply listed somewhere tersely. Issues that need attention right away, typically get attention right away, or at are tracked in some lightweight manner. A product launch effort that lasts only a few weeks to a few months might or might not use a “real” issue tracker in that short time, while an effort that grows to a long-term project will use one extensively for tracking, planning, support, etc.

Much more

This is just a short sampling of practices and how they may apply differently at the beginning of a short effort versus late into a large one.

Published by

Kyle Cordes

The technical principal of Oasis Digital, Kyle Cordes drives our technology and architecture choices. Kyle gives presentations and talks at user groups and other events.